Compare ERP system and accounting software | ERP vs. accounting software

ERP software vs. Accounting software

Introduction

If you want to automate your business operations but still can’t make decisions between Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and accounting software, here is a comparison that might help you.

What is Accounting Software?

Accounting software functions as a solution for the finance and accounting department. Thus, it deals with almost all financial and accounting issues of a company, for example:

  • Accounts payable
  • Accounts receivable
  • Cash flows
  • Ledger and balance sheets

Furthermore, after data collection, accounting software can process important financial data to produce financial reports, such as balance sheets, income statements, profit and loss statements, and statements of cash flow. As a result, you can check the company’s financial health easily, which helps speed up the decision-making process while reducing the administrative labor cost.

The market leaders of accounting software around the world are Quickbooks and Xero. However, in Vietnam is MISA the most popular.

What is ERP?

ERP software is usually a comprehensive solution for multiple departments of an enterprise. For example, Epicor ERP comprises a number of modules, namely, financial management, supply chain management, customer relationship management, project management,  production management, product data management, human resource management, sales management, service management, and planning and scheduling. All of these modules share a single integrated database and are customizable with regard to the need, size, and industry of the enterprise. Therefore, an ERP system can help increase productivity thanks to the automated cross-department data transmission and facilitate the business scale-up.

Epicor ERP 10

 

Comparison between ERP and accounting software

  1. Software scope – It is clear from the examples aforementioned that an ERP system includes accounting software.
  2. Benefit scope – Accounting software produces financial reports which give managers an insight into the enterprise’s financial health. On the other hand, an ERP system collects data from all departments and then generates reports on all operations of an organization. Thus, managers with the assistance of ERP have a more thorough overview of the company’s status. At the same time, they can make more accurate and effective decisions.
  3. Industry-specific design – As mentioned in the example of Epicor above, ERP is customizable to meet the needs of each industrial market and each user. However, accounting software rarely allows you to personalize its functions that way.
  4. Price – For those differences, it is understandable that ERP is more expensive than accounting software.

 

Conclusion

To sum up, you should consider implementing accounting software if your business is small, and your budget is tight. However, if you plan to scale up your business in the long run, it is worth investing in an ERP system. And if you still can’t make decisions which one you should have, contact us! You are more than welcome at Data V Tech!

 

Content writer: Ngoc Trang Vu

 

(more…)

17 In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

17 In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

Looking to change fields and get into tech, but don’t know what skills you need to launch your career? Maximize your marketability by pursuing tech skills in demand for the future!

Between 2016 and mid-2019, U.S. employers were only able to fill six of every 10 open tech positions, signaling a huge technology talent deficit in the U.S. Furthermore, over 50% of company learning & development leaders in a Udemy survey said technical skills were their top priority for training in 2020.

Of course, tech is a broad field, and there are a lot of interesting directions you can go in. In this article, we’ll look at the various areas of tech, how much demand exists for each skill, and where to go to start your learning journey.

Without further ado, here are 17 tech skills in demand in 2020—plus where to get the online technical training you need to become a pro.

AI is rapidly changing the landscape of work, making it an exciting time for programmers to look for something new. Hiring growth for AI specialists has grown 74% annually in the past 4 years. Because of its increasingly widespread adoption, AI specialists earned LinkedIn’s #1 emerging jobs spot.

There is a crossover with machine learning here (which you’ll learn about next!), but the key difference is that AI is a broader concept pertaining to machines designed to act intelligently like humans, whereas machine learning relies on devices making sense of a specific set of data.

In 2018, 31% of businesses said implementing AI was on their agenda for the next 12 months. Their top use cases are incorporating AI in data analysis and user experience.

Quick facts about AI as a tech career:

  • Average salary: $122,000 average across various AI careers
  • The amount of jobs requiring AI skills has multiplied by 4.5 since 2013
  • Artificial intelligence specialties can benefit a variety of tech careers, from software engineers to data scientists to product managers.

Where to learn it: Artificial Intelligence MicroMasters Program on edX

Must-have IT skills in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

This MicroMasters program encompasses 4 courses that explore distinct aspects and applications of AI. Understand the guiding concepts behind machine learning and AI, design your own artificial intelligence programs to solve real-world problems, learn about its application in physical robotics, and explore the world of animation and CGI.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: Artificial Intelligence MicroMasters Program
  • Platform: edX
  • Instructed by: Ansaf Salleb-Aouissi, John W. Paisley, Matei Ciocarlie, Eitan Grinspun
  • Price: $896.40 USD for the entire program
  • Skill level: Advanced (Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science or Mathematics and have a basic understanding of statistics, college-level algebra, calculus, and comfort with programming languages.)
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE?  

It’s a rigorous, graduate-level program of courses from an Ivy League university, representing 25% of Columbia’s coursework for a Master’s Degree in computer science.

Machine learning is one of the most innovative and exciting fields moving into the future, making it one of the most profitable skills you can learn. From Siri and Alexa to chatbots to predictive analysis to self-driving cars, there are a ton of uses for this futuristic tech.

Those who begin taking online courses in machine learning now will still be getting in relatively early, as demand is only increasing from here. According to McKinsey, 49% of companies are currently exploring or planning to use machine learning.

Machine learning can be applied to every industry, including healthcare, education, finance, etc. Translation? The possibilities are endless, and you can apply your machine learning skills to a role that suits your personality and interests.

Learn more about the difference between AI and machine learning and what to do if you want a career in machine learning in this interview with CTO Allan Leinwand.

Quick facts about machine learning as a tech career:

Where to learn it: Machine Learning on Coursera

In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Broad intro to entire machine learning workflow, including neural networks, statistical pattern recognition, deep learning, unsupervised learning, anomaly detection, recommender systems, and more.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: Machine Learning
  • Platform: Coursera
  • Instructed by: Andrew Ng (co-founder of Coursera)
  • Price: Free! (for the audit option, no graded items) or $79 (with certificate & graded assignments)
  • Skill level: Beginner/Intermediate (requires a basic understanding of linear algebra)
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

It has a 4.9-star rating (out of over 125,000 ratings), was created by Stanford University, touches on the theories behind machine learning as well as its practical applications, and is taught by the cofounder of Coursera!

Two consistently in-demand tech jobs within Big Data include data science and data analytics. Revenue from Big Data applications and analytics is projected to grow from $5.3B in 2018 to $19.4B in 2026.

84% of enterprises have launched advanced analytics and Big Data initiatives to accelerate their decision-making and bring greater accuracy. This is part of why data science has earned a top spot on LinkedIn’s emerging jobs report all three years the report has been conducted.

Data analysis is the more entry-level skill, whereas data science gets more advanced, but the careers are still cousins. Industries needing data professionals span education, finance, health, software, and more.

Quick facts about data science and analytics careers:

Where to learn it: Big Data Specialization on Coursera

Must-have IT skills in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Drive better business decisions with an overview of how big data is organized, analyzed, and interpreted. Apply your insights to real-world problems and questions.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: Big Data Specialization
  • Platform: Coursera
  • Instructed by: Ilkay Altintas, Amarnath Gupta and Mai Nguyen
  • Price: $49 per month with Coursera subscription
  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

Taught by San Diego Supercomputer Center experts, involves hands-on activities, and you’ll get a comprehensive knowledge of the entire Big Data industry so you can go on to choose a specialization in data analytics, science, engineering, etc.

Data engineering is separate from data science, but the former is what enables the latter to exist. Data engineers build the infrastructure and tools that data scientists rely on to conduct their own work.

Since 2015, the hiring growth rate of this technology job has increased by nearly 35% across a wide variety of industries.

There’s no better time for U.S. citizens to enter the field, due to changes in immigration laws. “Following recent government policy changes in the H1-B Visa application process, demand for US citizen data engineers has increased drastically and shows no signs of easing,” writes Sam Brown.

Quick facts about data engineering as a tech career:

Where to learn it: An Introduction to Google Cloud Platform for Data Engineers on Udemy

Must-have IT skills in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

All the core services you’ll need to know for the Google Cloud Data Engineer test, the basics of how to use Google Cloud Platform

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: An Introduction to Google Cloud Platform for Data Engineers
  • Platform: Udemy
  • Instructed by: Mike West
  • Price: $99.99 (but Udemy often has sales, especially around holidays)
  • Skill level: Intermediate (you’ll need a basic understanding of cloud technologies and SQL)
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

It’s the first course in a series geared at helping you get the Google Cloud Professional Data Engineer Certificate.

Data visualization is a way to help people understand the significance of data by placing it in a visual context. For instance, by turning spreadsheets or reports into charts and graphs that can be easily understood.

Think of this career as a bridge between technical and non-technical roles. You’re taking the data collected by analysts and transforming it into a form anyone can understand.

Quick facts about data visualization as a tech career:

  • Average salary: $98,264 per year for data visualization engineers
  • It’s in demand because employers can make sense of large amounts of data to drive real business results. For example, it can help them predict sales volume, understand what factors influence human behavior, identify areas in the business that can be improved, identify trends, relationships, patterns, etc.
  • It’s a blend of science and art: raw information meeting visually appealing mediums.
  • Data visualization is the key to “bringing the power of Big Data to the mainstream.

Where to learn it: Data Visualization for All on edX

In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Learn how to design interactive charts and customized maps for your website using Google Sheets, Tableau, Highcharts, Carto, Leaflet, GitHub

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: Data Visualization for All
  • Platform: edX
  • Instructed by: Jack Dougherty, Stacy Lam, David Tatem
  • Price: Free (add a verified certificate for $49)
  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

The course is taught by Trinity College faculty, and real-world examples are drawn from their students working with community organizations in Hartford, Connecticut.

For any company that collects customer information or deals with sensitive data of their own, keeping networks secure is paramount.

When data breaches do happen, they can be big, newsworthy, and costly for the company to recover from. The number of data breaches increased by 50% in 2019, and companies famously hacked in the past include Sony, LinkedIn, Chipotle, and others.

These situations underscore just how critical it is for companies to keep their network security up to par, and make cybersecurity one of the most-needed jobs and one of the technical skills in demand in 2020. Within just one year, company demand for security engineers has increased by 132%.

Unfortunately for those companies, right now there is a shortage of people trained in network security. Fortunately for you, that means there’s a gap in the market you can fill.

If you’re curious about filling that gap, read my ultimate guide to starting a career in cybersecurity.

Quick facts about cybersecurity as a tech career:

Where to learn it: Essentials of Cybersecurity on edX

In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

WHAT THE PROGRAM COVERS: 

The fundamentals of networks, systems administration, how to mitigate vulnerabilities, how to perform digital forensic analysis, risk assessment, etc.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Program Name: Essentials of Cybersecurity
  • Platform: edX
  • Instructed by: University of Washington
  • Price: $396
  • Skill level: Intermediate (must have a STEM Bachelor’s degree or 5 years of work experience in a technical environment)
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE?

It’s a professional certificate program made up of four courses. You’ll better understand the field of cybersecurity, what roles are available, and what cybersecurity career path is right for you.

Cloud computing jobs are on the rise because more and more companies are switching from the classical server infrastructure to cloud solutions. According to Gartner, the market for public cloud services is projected to grow by 17% in 2020 to a total of $266.4 billion.

Amazon Web Services is one of these cloud platforms, featuring content delivery, database storage, networking, and moreover 50 services in total. Since it is currently the biggest platform, we’ll highlight some specific facts about AWS in this section (and give an extra course recommendation for it!).

AWS specialists are usually engineers, cloud architects, or system administrators. IT professionals who are AWS-certified earn more than their non-certified counterparts. It’s one of the most profitable skills an IT employee can learn to level up their tech career, as AWS specialists earn an average of $113,000 (the highest of all certifications in the United States and Canada)

Quick facts about cloud computing as a tech career:

Where to learn general cloud computing: Cloud Computing Specialization on Coursera

In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Clouds, Distributed Systems, Networking. Learn about and build distributed and networked systems for clouds and big data.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: Cloud Computing Specialization
  • Platform: Coursera
  • Instructed by: Reza Farivar, Ankit Singla, Indranil Gupta, P. Brighten Godfrey, and Roy H. Campbell
  • Price: $49 per month with Coursera subscription
  • Skill level: Intermediate
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

Hands-on activities, taught by computer science professors

Where to learn Amazon Web Services: Amazon Web Services (AWS) Fundamentals for System Administrators on Pluralsight

Amazon Web Services (AWS) Fundamentals for System Administrators

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Core AWS skills and concepts needed to begin working with AWS and to achieve AWS certification.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: Amazon Web Services (AWS) Fundamentals for System Administrators
  • Platform: Pluralsight
  • Instructed by: Elias Khnaser
  • Price: Free
  • Skill level: Intermediate (requires working knowledge of virtualization, networking essentials, and general systems administration)
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

You’ll have a solid understanding of how various AWS services are architected and how you can use them.

Virtual reality and augmented reality—the collective term is extended reality, or XR—are trending to be useful for more than just entertainment in the future. Marketing, advertising, health care, and manufacturing are some industries that have already begun adopting XR technology.

According to Hired’s 2019 State of Software Engineers report, demand for AR and VR engineers surged by an incredible 1,400%. But a little under just one year prior (from Feb ‘18-Feb ‘19), job searches had actually decreased by 13.48% for these roles. This implies that while jobs in this area are skyrocketing, the number of job-hunting candidates hasn’t had time to keep up, presenting a good opportunity for those who want to train for this top tech skill now.

In the near future, AR is looking to outpace VR for growth and profitability. Reports predict that the global VR gaming market size will be worth $22.9 billion by the end of 2020, while AR will be worth a stunning $133 billion by 2022.

Quick facts about Extended Reality (XR) as a tech career:

Where to learn it: Extended Reality (XR) – Building AR | VR | MR Projects on Udemy

In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Learn how to make VR and AR apps with 3D game development. You’ll gain a better understanding of the complex landscape of extended reality, build your own 3D world, and deploy your own applications.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: Extended Reality (XR) – Building AR | VR | MR Projects on Udemy
  • Platform: Udemy
  • Instructed by: Packt Publishing
  • Price: $124.99 (although Udemy often has sales on)
  • Skill level: Beginner/Intermediate (Some prior familiarity with AR/VR frameworks will be useful but not mandatory.)
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

It’s a relatively short course (5 hours of content) that will level up your game development skills.

In the broadest sense, the term IoT encompasses everything connected to the internet, but it is increasingly being used to define objects that “talk” to each other.

“Simply, the Internet of Things is made up of devices—from simple sensors to smartphones and wearables—connected together,” says Matthew Evans, the IoT program head at techUK.

Everything that’s connected to the internet can be hacked, which is why security is one top concern with these devices. California and the UK have both recently introduced legislation to make IoT devices safer and more secure. Cybersecurity professionals who specialize in IoT will likely be highly sought after for this reason.

Quick facts about IoT as a tech career:

Where to learn it: Internet of Things (IoT) on edX

In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Design IoT solutions and networks, identify components required, understand how data management fits in, analyze security risks, and ultimately produce a fleshed-out idea that’s ready to prototype

COURSE FACTS:

WHY THIS COURSE? 

The MicroMasters program—taught by a range of professors, specialists, and lecturers from Curtin University—includes 6 self-paced IoT courses, live discussions, remote access to real laboratory equipment for practical sessions. The program is credit-eligible for Curtin University Master’s degrees.

While they’re in the same family, UI and UX are different. UI (user interface) specialists design interfaces for websites and apps to be visually appealing, flow well and be easy for users to navigate. UX (user experience) specialists do a lot of research and testing to consider every element of how the user will interact with the company and website, coordinating with developers and UI designers.

This type of career is perfect for those who want a creative-meets-analytical type of role (graphic design meets A/B testing and so on).

Ultimately, UI is better for those who want to focus on the visuals, layout, and general look and feel of a page or product. UX is better for those who want to use analysis and testing to help a business seamlessly meet their users’ needs.

Quick facts about UI/UX as a tech career:

Where to learn it: User Experience Design Fundamentals on Udemy

In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

The critical elements of user experience–strategy, scope, structure, skeleton, and surface. Learn the basics (e.g. what UX design is and why it’s important), strategy/theory (e.g. use of color and typography), and implementation (e.g. how to create wireframes).

COURSE FACTS: 

  • Course Name: User Experience Design Fundamentals
  • Instructed by: Joe Natoli
  • Price: $94.99 (but Udemy often has sales, especially around holidays)
  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

It has a 4.3-star rating from over 7,000 ratings, with 67,405 students enrolled. The instructor has been helping Fortune 100, Fortune 500, and various government organizations with UX design for nearly three decades.

There are 3.5 billion smartphone users in the world today, and that number is continuing to grow every year. This means that companies who want to stay relevant don’t just need websites; they need apps. Having mobile development skills also comes with the perk that if you can build apps for others, you can build and sell your own as well–so it’s an ideal career path for aspiring entrepreneurs.

One interesting direction that mobile apps are headed in is augmented reality. Apps like Pokémon Go and Harry Potter: Wizards Unite game engage with the real world, blending technology and reality.

If you want to start learning mobile development without committing to the Team Treehouse tech degree spotlighted below, check out these 21 mobile app development courses.

Quick facts about mobile development as a tech career:

  • Average salary: $96K+ (with starting salaries as high as $75K)

  • At the time of writing, there are over 49,000 mobile developer jobs posted on Glassdoor.

  • The global app economy is predicted to be worth $6.3 trillion by 2021, up from $1.3 trillion in 2016.

  • The future of mobile development goes beyond phones: wearable technologies, the Internet of Things, beacon technology, an increase in the use of VR/AR, and more.

Where to learn it: Team Treehouse’s Beginning iOS track

Must-have IT skills in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Swift is the language of iOS, created by Apple. You can use the language to build applications for the iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and more. Build your own apps or land a full-time job at a company that uses Swift.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: Beginning iOS
  • Platform: Treehouse
  • Instructed by: Pasan Premaratne
  • Price: $25/month
  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

Learn how to program from absolute scratch using Swift and learn many fundamental concepts that will get you started writing code immediately. (No prior programming experience is needed.)

Originally devised for the digital currency Bitcoin, blockchain has evolved. The tech community is now finding other potential uses for the technology, such as peer-to-peer payments, crowdfunding, file storage, identity management, digital voting, etc. Learn more about blockchain/cryptocurrency jobs in this article.

“With platforms like Ethereum taking the lead, more and more companies need developers who understand the blockchain, smart contracts, and can build decentralized applications,” writes Anna Belaya.

Some of the blockchain skills you should know to include networking, cryptography computing, database design, and programming languages ranging from Java, JavaScript, and C++ to Go, Solidity, and Python.

QUICK FACTS ABOUT BLOCKCHAIN AS A TECH CAREER:

Where to learn it: Blockchain Specialization on Coursera

Blockchain Specialization on Coursera

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Broad intro into what blockchain is, including how to design and program smart contracts and decentralized applications

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: Blockchain Specialization
  • Platform: Coursera
  • Instructed by: Bina Ramamurthy
  • Price: $49 per month with Coursera subscription
  • Skill level: Beginner/Intermediate (requires knowledge of at least one modern, high-level programming language)
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

Includes hands-on activities and is taught by a computer science professor at University at Buffalo.

If you’re okay with a little uncertainty in your career (and you enjoy science fiction), quantum computing is a field to consider. “The industry has a ways to go,” writes Sophia Chen. “They have a timeline, sort of, give or take a few decades. And at the moment, their roadmap has at least one glaring pothole: a lack of trained people.”

However, this provides an opportunity for you to help move the needle forward. Jeremy O’Brien, physicist and professorial research fellow at the University of Bristol, says that quantum computers could outperform everyday computers in less than 10 years.

Quick facts about quantum computing as a tech career:

  • Average salary: $82,965
  • Current quantum computing roles include software engineers, researchers, experimental scientists, and programmers.
  • You can contribute to Qiskit Terra and Qiskit Aqua code and algorithms to start getting involved with quantum computing and get noticed by hiring managers.

Where to learn it: The Introduction to Quantum Computing on Coursera

The Introduction to Quantum Computing on Coursera

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Mathematical models of quantum computing, quantum algorithms, and more.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course Name: The Introduction to Quantum Computing
  • Platform: Coursera
  • Instructed by: Сысоев Сергей Сергеевич
  • Price: $49 per month with Coursera subscription
  • Skill level: Intermediate (requires knowledge of complex numbers and linear algebra)
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

“We will build a simple working quantum computer with our bare hands, and we will consider some algorithms designed for bigger quantum computers which are not yet developed.”

As a robotics engineer, you can specialize in software or hardware roles, working on virtual or physical bots. Physical robotics can encompass medical equipment, exploration bots, animatronics for films or amusement parks, automated manufacturing equipment, and more.

Virtual bots can exist in software and online to help automate tasks like customer service, virtual assistance, etc. You’ll notice an overlap with AI in this space.

Quick facts about robotics as a tech career:

Where to learn it: Robotics Specialization on Coursera

Robotics Specialization on Coursera

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Learn how robots operate, adjust their movements across a variety of terrains, serve useful real-world functions in scenarios like disaster recovery and healthcare, and so on. For a course project, you’ll learn how to program a robot to move and fly.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course name: Robotics Specialization
  • Platform: Coursera
  • Instructed by: Jianbo Shi, Daniel Lee, Daniel E. Koditschek, Kostas Daniilidis, Vijay Kumar, CJ Taylor, Sid Deliwala
  • Price: $39/month with Coursera subscription
  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

This specialization is comprised of 6 courses taught by a collection of professors from the School of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania.

There’s no single job description of product management; roles will likely look different across different companies and product types (software, apps, physical products, etc).

One thing in common is that at its core, product management is about making a product the best it can be. That may entail considering market demand, conducting surveys and potential user tests, acting as a liaison between developers and designers assigned to the product, etc.

Especially if you’re working on a technical product, having the ability to understand and speak tech terminology will make you more successful.

Learn more about how to become a product manager here (a podcast episode with Sam Gimbel, who started out by studying neuroscience and became a product manager and later the co-founder of his own businesses).

Quick facts about product management as a tech career:

Where to learn it: Become a Product Manager | Learn the Skills & Get the Job on Udemy

Become a Product Manager | Learn the Skills & Get the Job on Udemy

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS:  

Learn all the skills involved in product management, from idea through execution. You’ll become familiar with the processes and tools involved in market research, prototyping, metric measuring, understanding core tech concepts, leading a team, and more.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course name: Become a Product Manager | Learn the Skills & Get the Job
  • Platform: Udemy
  • Instructed by: Cole Mercer, Evan Kimbrell
  • Price: $194.99 (but Udemy often has sales, especially around holidays)
  • Skill level: Beginner, but familiarity with basic business concepts is helpful
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

In addition to teaching the skills, the course dedicates time to the job-search process as well, giving tips on the resume, portfolio, interview, and what to look for in product management jobs. Over a thousand students who have taken this course now work as product managers.

Salesforce is one of the world’s top 10 software companies by annual revenue, so there are a lot of opportunities for work in this space. CRMs, or customer relationship management solutions, provide companies with efficient ways to manage their sales, marketing, and customer support.

Developers are able to build on existing Salesforce infrastructure to create applications and projects specific to the needs of their company.

#7 on LinkedIn’s emerging jobs report was a Sales Development Representative, which mixes a traditional sales role with Salesforce technology expertise. As it’s not a purely technical role, it can be a good place to start within the broader universe of Salesforce.

On the podcast, listen to Zac Otero talk about transitioning into tech as a self-taught Salesforce admin.

Quick facts about Salesforce as a tech career:

Where to learn it: Salesforce Development Training for Beginners on Udemy

In-Demand Technology Skills to Learn in 2020

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS: 

Programming in Apex (the language of Salesforce), creating a Salesforce developer’s account, and all the features you can implement.

COURSE FACTS:

  • Course name: Salesforce Development Training for Beginners on Udemy
  • Platform: Udemy
  • Instructed by: Deepika Khanna
  • Price: $199.99  (but Udemy often has sales, especially around holidays)
  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Enroll in the course here

WHY THIS COURSE? 

Assumes no prior Salesforce experience and provides real-world examples to illustrate the concepts you’re learning.

Having a foundation of programming language skills can open doors for you in a lot of different ways.

On Glassdoor’s list of top jobs for 2020, careers requiring coding skills are well-represented. Front-end engineer is their #1 best job, Java developer is #2, the software engineer is #7, etc. Full-stack engineering has seen 35% of hiring growth every year since 2015.

When it comes to specific skills, there are some notable trends:

Of course, the language that’s best for you to learn depends on your specific goals.

Courses to Learn 17 Programming Languages

  1. HTML and CSS: HTML5 and CSS Fundamentals on edX (Free — add verified certificate for $99)
  2. JavaScript: JavaScript Path on Pluralsight ($29/month with a Pluralsight membership)
  3. Python: Introduction to Python Programming on Udacity (free)
  4. Java: Introduction to Programming in Java on edX ($297)
  5. C#: C# Path on Pluralsight ($29/month with a Pluralsight membership)
  6. PHP: PHP Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning ($24.99)
  7. Go: Programming with Google Go Specialization on Coursera ($49/month with a Coursera membership)
  8. Scala: Introduction to Scala on Team Treehouse ($24/month with a Team Treehouse subscription)
  9. Ruby: Learn to Code with Ruby on Udemy ($199.99 but Udemy often has sales)
  10. Typescript: Introduction to TypeScript 2 on edX (Free — add verified certificate for $99)
  11. Kotlin: Kotlin Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning ($24.99)
  12. SQL: The Complete SQL Bootcamp on Udemy ($194.99 but often on sale)
  13. Swift: Swift Fundamentals on Pluralsight ($29/month with a Pluralsight membership)
  14. R: R Programming: Advanced Analytics In R For Data Science ($199.99 but often on sale)
  15. C: Introduction to Programming in C Specialization on Coursera ($49/month with a Coursera membership)
  16. C++: C++ Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning ($44.99)
  17. Objective-C: Foundations of Objective-C App Development on Coursera ($39/month with a Coursera membership)

Data V Tech Solutions Company is proud to be a leading ERP consulting firm that facilitates the personal development of each team member and helps them gain necessary IT skills.

Pharma Pharmaceuticals deploys Epicor ERP

Pharma Pharmaceuticals deploys Epicor ERP

Epicor Software Corporation, a global provider of industry-specific enterprise software, has announced that Pharma Pharmaceutical Industries (Pharma)—a leader in the kingdom’s pharmaceutical services industry—has implemented Epicor ERP to enhance data capture and archiving capabilities, optimise operational efficiencies, and guarantee on-time delivery to customers.
Pharma brings together business leaders and healthcare veterans to offer services to the Saudi pharmaceutical industry that include branding, marketing and sales, warehousing and logistics, facilities management, and regulatory compliance consultancy.
The company’s international reach demanded a new approach to technology to ensure it remained a leader in the new global digital economy. It embarked upon a bold digital transformation journey, with a robust ERP platform as the planned keystone.
“We didn’t have an ERP platform in place and relied on a paper system to manage each department’s activity,” said Tariq Kayyali, quality unit director and ERP project manager, Pharma Pharmaceuticals Industries, whose team of stakeholders focused on linking and integrating department transactions to reduce the time taken to locate vital archived data.
Errors in starting materials and the resulting mix-ups and delays in order deliveries became significant business risks to the company, pre-digitization. The risk of using incorrect or expired material in the manufacturing process was compounded by the company’s inability to accurately control all its assets and due to its tendency to produce inaccurate reports due to manual compilation.
With the support of trusted Epicor partner, Full Insight Technology Solutions (FITS), Pharma deployed a platform that was easy to install, user-intuitive, and provided tight-fit functionality with its needs. Over a period of 10 months, the system was rolled out to 15 users, who all reported ease of use and unprecedented accuracy.
Switching to Epicor ERP has allowed Pharma to smoothly link and integrate transactions across all departments and enhance accuracy in operations and inventory control. Strict audit trails now allow every critical transaction to be traced—to the user, date, and time of action—allowing Pharma to closely monitor related business impacts. Labelling problems have also been overcome, by enabling greater control over purchased and manufactured parts.
“We ended up saving about 30 percent of unnecessary warehouse-team transactions and managed to reduce the time taken to find or track historical data records or transactions, from hours or days to seconds or minutes,” said Kayyali. “We also reduced the risk of mix-up and eliminated the possibility Pharma Pharmaceuticals deploys Epicor ERP to streamline processes and optimise service delivery of using an invalid or expired part as a starting material—which is critical in the pharma industry.”
Having a validated ERP system helps us meet the expectations and compliance requirements of medicinal product agencies, both in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and around the world.”
“Remaining relevant in the digital economy is no minor feat,” added Amel Gardner, regional vice president, Middle East, Africa and India (MEAI), Epicor.
“Competitors—especially new market entrants—will not be using manual processes for critical functions. It is therefore vital that all firms digitise as much as possible. Epicor ERP will give Pharma a strong platform for growth and enable it to easily comply with granular industry requirements. The platform is designed to fit every business like a glove, delivering automation and operational enhancements that pave the way to true digital transformation.” — Tradearabia News Service

 

Data V Tech is proud to be one of the leading ERP vendors in the Asia Pacific. We have implemented Epicor ERP for many enterprises and organizations in Vietnam and China, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry. For direct consultation, please feel free to contact us.

Learn about Epicor ERP in the wake of COVID-19 and get ready for the future.

Epicor ERP in Covid-19

Epicor launches partner support program in wake of COVID-19

Epicor has launched its ‘Fit for the Future’ program, designed to aid the company’s partners to build business resilience in response to COVID-19 and succeed in the current landscape.

According to Epicor, it is crucial to support partners as these businesses are a ‘vital’ component of Epicor’s go-to-market model. As such, the company is focused on providing competency, capability, and capacity within the market so partners can better serve and deliver value to its customers, Epicor states.

Partners include resellers, system integrators, and service partners, which can implement, design, and develop transformational IT strategies using the Epicor product portfolio and tools.

The program supports ongoing remote working situations and focuses on three core pillars, collaboration, skills and communication.

Togetherness: One Team focuses on staying connected to partners providing help in navigating changes and supporting connectivity and agility, the company states.

Epicor is actively encouraging partners to share their experiences and learnings in order to drive business improvements needed to fuel continued growth and shore up business resilience.

Partners will be able to access recordings, PowerPoint presentations, demo scripts, and other supporting documents from a partner hub to boost sales and scalability, Epicor states.

Developing Skills and Value brings an enablement plan to help partners continue develop a range of skills that can help them to remain competitive and agile in coming months.

Training is being delivered through a range of virtual sessions focused on sales skills, where attendees gain understanding in customer pain points and how to articulate increased value to customers; operational efficiencies and how to improve the customer experience; capability in accessing valuable collateral and managing pipeline; and business planning and driving SMART objectives.

To support partner development, Epicor is also publishing a series of weekly webinars and has been offering free-of-charge certifications over the last month.

Communication focuses on Epicor’s commitment to sharing information that ensures partners have useful data to help customers through a variety of new market challenges.

By keeping the lines of communication open, Epicor states it hopes to continue to grow alongside its partners, whilst supporting the wellbeing of each business and its employees.

Epicor Software vice president channel sales Paul Flannery says, “By investing in our partner community and supporting them through challenging times such as these, we are making sure businesses are resilient, by equipping them with the resources, tools, and knowledge needed to emerge stronger than ever before.

“We are dedicated to help our partners by helping them to thrive and adapt to the current environment in a way that’s rapid, streamlined, and scalable.”

For partners who have participated in the ‘Fit for the Future’ program, Epicor will be recognising these efforts through a scheme called the ‘Partner Olympics’.

Points will be awarded for attending webinars, downloading information from the partner hub, and achieving certifications. By putting this scheme in place, Epicor aims to drive continued engagement, whilst helping partners to adapt to a rapidly changing global climate.

Source: Chanellife


Data V Tech is proud to be one of the leading ERP vendors in the Asia Pacific. We have implemented Epicor ERP for many enterprises and organizations in Vietnam and China. For direct consultation, please feel free to contact us.

Learn about Epicor ERP in the wake of COVID-19 and get ready for the future.

Regional internet of things RIoT mitigates COVID-19 crisis

Regional Internet of Things group RIoT plans webinar to fight virus

In this time of fear and confusion, NC RIoT will be sharing a message of hope and progress as leaders in the tech space share how the Internet of Things and Data can mitigate the effects of the current COVID-19 crisis and prepare for others in the future.

This virtual event will explore novel ways that technology and data can be used to combat pandemics & protect public health.

RIoT [the Regional Internet of Things users group] has always expressed its belief in technology’s role of promoting economic growth, but now more than ever, we’d like to highlight its role in defending public health. Although living in a modern, connected world has enabled the quicker spread of the virus, our modernity can also be our white knight if we start putting our advancements to better use in the public health sector. Tune in to the discussion to learn more.

Featured Speakers Include:

+ Tom Snyder (Executive Director – RIoT) – Moderator

+ Veena Misra (Center Director – ASSIST) – Wearable sensors for persistent health monitoring

+ Brian Bender (Chief Science Officer – Intake) – Personal health monitoring

+ Ashlee Valente (Senior Scientist – Torus) & John Harer (CEO – Torus) – Analytics for massively complex systems like global health

+ Steve Bennett (Director of Public Sector Practice – SAS) – AI for faster vaccine development

+ Emil Runge (Director of Programs – BARDA/First Flight Venture Center) – Funding opportunities for COVID research

+ Michael Levy (President – Digital Health Institute for Transformation) – Keeping mental health front of mind

+ Nick Jordan (CEO – Smashing Boxes) – Data use across EHR systems

+ Manal El-Ramly (Director, Board of Directors – Newsco) – Information dissemination via the screens all around us

Can the Internet of Things play a role in the future when we are challenged by the next contagion? WRAL TechWire reached out to Tom Snyder, executive director of NC RIoT, a large and growing users group focusing on research and commercialization surrounding IoT device and application development, for his analysis.


Data V Tech is proud to be one of the leading ERP vendors in the Asia Pacific. We have implemented Epicor ERP for many enterprises and organizations in Vietnam and China. For direct consultation, please feel free to contact us.

facts about Internet of Things (IoT) to prevent future pandemics

These Facts Will Change Your Mind About the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things market expands way beyond smart homes and can even be used to prevent future pandemics.

Thanks to advances in technology and the proliferation of connected devices, the Internet of Things era has arrived.

It’s been years in the making but appears poised to go mainstream. According to the consulting firm McKinsey, the number of IoT-connected devices is forecast to hit 43 billion by 2023, almost three times the number of devices in 2018. Companies and consumers are using IoT to control their heating and cooling systems remotely, doctors use it to monitor patients, and manufacturers track products across the supply chain.

There are a lot of reasons why IoT is growing in popularity. Convenience and on-the-go-access are two big ones. But there are also those jaw-dropping reasons that will surprise even the biggest IoT skeptic. Here’s a look at four of them.

1. It can help prevent the spread of diseases like COVID-19

The novel coronavirus outbreak is having a devastating impact on people around the globe. Spain, Italy, and France are effectively shut down, and schools and businesses across the United States are closed. The stock market has been whipsawing between huge gains and losses, and the global economy is taking a major hit.

While IoT can’t stop COVID-19 (the disease caused by the coronavirus) from spreading, it can be used to prevent future pandemics. In an IoT world outlined by the financial consulting firm Frost & Sullivan, a network of sensors placed throughout the world would be used to monitor individuals for infections, acting as an early detection system. That would reduce uncertainty in the stock market and provide governments with proof to quickly act on and stop the spread.

Implementing this on a global scale isn’t likely anytime soon. Some countries, China included, will be able to do it within their borders. Add facial recognition and GPS to the mix, and Frost & Sullivan’s global research director for IoT, Dilip Sarangan, says countries would be able to monitor those who have contracted the virus and track whom they come into contact with. That could prevent virus outbreaks from becoming pandemics. “While this may sound like a police state to many, ultimately, leveraging IoT and [artificial intelligence] AI may be the most logical way to prevent highly infectious diseases from spreading rapidly in a world that is getting smaller every day with air travel,” said Sarangan in a recent report.

There’s a slew of companies that can benefit from these early defense systems, including equipment makers and network operators. In the U.S. the wireless network providers AT&T (NYSE:T), Verizon (NYSE:VZ), T-Mobile USA (NASDAQ:TMUS), and Sprint (NYSE:S) are big beneficiaries as data is transmitted across the world.

2. 5G will proliferate the number of connected devices

With COVID-19 spreading around the world, commerce has come to a screeching halt, and that’s particularly true in the smartphone market. Hit by supply chain issues in China and a lack of demand as the number of people in quarantine grow, several mobile-phone-related companies including Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Qualcomm (NASDAQ:QCOM) have issued guidance warnings for their current quarters.

Despite the business interruptions, the buildout of 5G will eventually pick up, driving what is expected to be a huge smartphone upgrade cycle. It’s also expected to increase the number of devices connected to the internet, thanks to the speed and security 5G brings. With 5G networks, data can be sent back and forth between millions of devices in seconds, something not possible with existing 4G networks. That will result in billions of new devices outside of smartphones and tablets that connect to the internet.

The melding of 5G and IoT will be behind the adoption of smart cities and connected cars. It will also enable doctors to remotely treat patients and help robotic surgery become the norm. Gartner expects there to be 5.8 billion connected devices by the end of this year. That’s up 21% from the 4.8 billion at the end of 2019.

3. More than $1 trillion will be spent on IoT

Love it or hate it, the IoT market is exploding with no end in sight. Trillions of dollars are being spent on IoT start-ups as investors clamor to get in on the leaders of tomorrow. The interest is coming from an array of venture capitalists who are pouring tons of money into the market — for good reason. According to IDC, yearly spending on IoT is projected to surpass $1 trillion by 2022, growing at a double-digit rate. That bodes well for equipment providers like Cisco Systems (NASDAQ:CSCO). With global traffic poised to triple thanks to 5G, Cisco and its peers will be able to provide the hardware needed to facilitate the movement of the data.

There are a lot of IoT use cases, but the ones drawing the biggest investments are those focused on the business market. IDC projected IoT spending by the manufacturing industry would hit $100 billion in 2019, while production asset management will attract $4.2 billion, smart home $44.1 billion, and freight monitoring $41.7 billion. The areas that are expected to see the fastest growth and thus the biggest investment dollars through 2022 include automation, electric vehicle charging, agriculture field monitoring, bedside telemetry, and in-store marketing, IDC predicted.

4. Most consumers and businesses want government IoT security regulations

The combination of IoT and 5G will transform society for the better, but that doesn’t mean it’s smooth sailing ahead. There are a lot of security risks to consumers and businesses that can’t be left unchecked.

It’s something that both businesses and consumers are worried about. According to a recent survey of consumers and businesses by digital security company Gemalto, 90% of businesses and consumers believe the IoT industry should be regulated by the government. What’s more, 61% of businesses think IoT regulation should dictate who is responsible for securing the data throughout its journey.

Of the consumers polled, 65% said they are worried a hacker could take over their IoT device. Meanwhile, 60% said they are afraid their data will fall into the wrong hands. Those fears aren’t unfounded. Security from Kaspersky Labs spotted more than 100 million attacks on IoT devices in the first half of 2019 alone.

Without a doubt, risks abound as more devices are connected to the internet. But with such wide-ranging benefits and investor interest, even IoT naysayers can’t deny the market is poised to explode. Those four jaw-dropping facts alone prove it.

Source: Donna Fuscaldo


Data V Tech is proud to be one of the leading ERP vendors in the Asia Pacific. We have implemented Epicor ERP for many enterprises and organizations in Vietnam and China. For direct consultation, please feel free to contact us.

end of enterprise resource planning

The end of enterprise resource planning

end of enterprise resource planninghe Harvard Business Review ran an article in 1990 by management consultant and former Massachusetts Institute of Technology computer science professor Michael Hammer titled “Reengineering Work: Don’t Automate, Obliterate.” Hammer, recognized as the seminal theorist of reengineering, the consultant-driven discipline of streamlining work processes, encouraged businesses to radically restructure rather than rely on information technology to automate work.

This proved impossible. While the 1990s is now viewed as an epoch of business reengineering, the revamp of work processes advanced hand in hand with the rise of centralized corporate IT, enabled by enterprise resource planning (ERP) software.

The 2020s, on the other hand, appear poised for the final takedown of monolithic business IT in response to a new revolution in work processes spurred and enabled by digitization. IT managers in the chemical industry, among the first industries to opt for ERP systems, are preparing for a new wave of change in business management software.

To understand the likely changes ahead, it helps to look back at the provenance and evolution of IT systems currently in operation at most chemical companies.

The computing infrastructures that emerged some 30 years ago supported efficiency gains, the kind also targeted by business reengineering. But ERP software installations also caused years-long headaches for many companies as they converted from hodgepodge mixes of software to monolithic IT systems covering most financial aspects of business and plant operations.

During this period, SAP, a German software firm started by former IBM engineers, rose to prominence in ERP. Starting with its first customer, the UK’s Imperial Chemical Industries, SAP swept the chemical sector. By the early 2000s, many major companies had lashed their operations to the firm’s R/3 software.
By today’s standards, the IT platforms of the early 21st century are museum pieces. Cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and big data have fundamentally changed IT and the workplace.

SAP and other major vendors of ERP software, including Oracle and JD Edwards, have introduced successive generations of their products over the years that chip away at the monolithic, comparatively lethargic control of early IT architectures. In the process, a modular approach to IT has emerged in which specialized software for specific work functions can be added to a centralized, often multivendor network of business management software with an ERP system at the core.

Industry watchers agree that the next step is to re-engineer the core.

“Enterprise resource planning has evolved far beyond its original purpose and scope,” the consulting firm Gartner writes in a report issued last year. “It now represents different things to different organizations, but in all cases is no longer focused on ‘resources’ or ‘planning.’ ” The view is echoed by Forrester, another consulting firm, in a recent report: “Today, we see the beginning of a new era of operational systems that are so different that calling them ERP no longer makes sense.”

The abbreviation is still in use, however, despite the alternatives floated, such as Forrester’s DOP, for digital operations platform. Gartner characterizes the current, modular state of business software as postmodern ERP. Mike Guay, a senior analyst with the firm, describes a “hybrid approach” in which specialist companies like Salesforce.com, a provider of customer relationship software, can add modules to an ERP system.

Guay notes that ERP vendors have partnered with and acquired specialized software providers to offer hybrid networks. SAP, for example, acquired SuccessFactors, a cloud-based human resources management services provider, and now offers the service as an adjunct to its core software.

In Guay’s view, today’s generation of postmodern software is starting to give way to something more abstract. This fourth generation of ERP—counting hodgepodge computing and monolithic software as the first and second—will dismantle the familiar image of centralized control.

GENERATIONS

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) software’s path is from dispersed to monolithic to dispersed again.

end of enterprise resource planning

1980s to 1990s: Best of breed

 Functionally focused software

 Multiple vendors

 Lack of central control

can businesses stop automating

1990s to 2000s: Monolithic

 One core software product

 Centralized information technology

 Oversight by the corporate IT department

can enterprises stop automating

2010 to the foreseeable future: Postmodern ERP

 Networking of specialized software

 Maintenance of a central ERP backbone

 Access to cloud-based software and services

 Oversight by independent business departments

can we stop automation

Emerging architecture: Beyond ERP

 Supporting digitized business functions

 Greater automation with artificial intelligence

 Functional applications easily added to core IT

 Breakdown of business function silos

 Programming and oversight by power users

▸ Rise of functional applications

Source: Gartner.

“In 3 to 5 years,” he says, “IT focus will shift from doing most of the development in IT departments to architecting an environment in which the end-users — the power users in their departments—will actually be able to build applications. Low-code/no-code development platforms are emerging as a standard in the market right now.”

Liz Herbert, a vice president, and principal analyst at Forrester says business software is now driven by the speed at which data can be processed. “ERP conjures up overly complex, slow-moving technology that may not live up to expectations,” she says. “Technology has changed dramatically. It is much more cloud-based, much more built for intelligence, more for flexibility and easy extensibility by business users. Not everything has to rely on programmers and IT departments.”

Artificial intelligence will play an increasing role in business IT, Herbert says. AI was initially harnessed to improve error detection and automation accuracy, but the technique is ramping up. She points to two examples at SAP: Ariba, software for managing materials procurement that employs IBM’s Watson AI technology, and Concur, a travel and expense system that applies AI to vetting expense reports using data from receipts.

The latest iteration of SAP’s ERP software, S/4Hana, reflects the changes the consultants see. It stores tables in columns rather than in standard row arrangements, vastly increasing the speed of data analysis, the firm says. The database allows transactional and analytical work to be done simultaneously.

Joe Binkley, SAP’s director of cloud platform product marketing, notes that S/4Hana employs in-memory data processing, in which data is stored in random-access memory rather than disk storage or relational databases. “It means we are able to dramatically recast our systems and do things in seconds that used to require waiting days to complete.”

Dave Dunn, head of marketing for chemicals at SAP, says the company remains the dominant supplier of ERP software in the sector, counting 6,500 users it categorizes as chemical companies. A modular approach to adding software, such as Salesforce.com and SAP’s own adjuncts in areas like materials sourcing, has advanced with upgrades to R/3 in recent years. This includes a version called ECC consisting of a suite of business management software modules that put the tool to reach for smaller companies.

“Only the large guys could afford it years ago,” Dunn says. “With S/4 and ECC, a load of smaller, mid-tier companies has implemented SAP because it is simpler and much faster, to implement.”

Melanie Kalmar, chief information officer at Dow, says the company is focused on simplifying work processes and making it easier for customers to do business with Dow. – Credit: Dow

Dow, an early adopter of ERP, has rolled with the changes at SAP for decades. The company gained somewhat of a renegade reputation years ago by skipping an upgrade to R/3 when most of its cohorts converted. Dow eventually undertook a multimillion-dollar conversion to a version of the SAP software to which users add targeted software products, essentially the first step into Gartner’s postmodern ERP world. Since then, Dow has pushed further.

“Over the past few years, we have migrated capabilities to software-as-a-service solutions,” says Melanie Kalmar, chief information officer at Dow, referring to a technique of accessing software from cloud-based providers and paying a service fee rather than purchasing it. “Our current focus is all about simplification in how we do work. This means making it easier for our customers to do business with us while providing capabilities for our employees that make their job easier and them more empowered.”

Dow will continue adding “best-in-class” applications to its ERP system, Kalmar says while eliminating applications that fall short. “There is no plan to move away from our core ERP capabilities or to move away from our strategy of one global ERP instance,” she says.

DuPont is similarly working to adapt its core SAP system to a new generation of business IT. “We are constantly working to simplify yet modernize our enterprise-wide systems, including our legacy ERP,” says Steve Larrabee, chief information officer for the company. “Artificial intelligence, particularly in the R&D and manufacturing spaces, has helped significantly advance the roll of IT-based technology as a key business and value driver.”

Larrabee adds that modernizing and evolving from a monolithic ERP system does not lessen the importance of a core IT infrastructure. Centralized data, or “master data,” support old and new technologies, he says, and are necessary to “provide real-time information both to optimize our working processes and guide our decision-making.”

Evonik Industries, another longtime SAP user, is also sticking with its core system. “For Evonik’s core transactional business processes, like ‘order to cash’ or ‘plan to produce,’ a reliable and on-time information flow is key,” says Bettina Uhlich, the firm’s chief information officer. “You just want to have the right data at the right time in the right place. For this, well-integrated IT architecture is a key success factor. We see the monolithic ERP as an advantage.” She points to the company’s success in integrating the ERP system of J.M. Huber’s silica business, which Evonik acquired in 2017.

But Evonik also moves in the postmodern ERP world described by Gartner. “Business IT architecture can now draw from a far bigger solution portfolio than just SAP,” Uhlich says. “This might make it more challenging for the IT department, but it is clearly an advantage for the business.”

And challenges lie ahead. A move underway at Evonik to convert to SAP’s S/4Hana by next year will be more thorough than a mere software upgrade, Uhlich says. It will be a conversion of Evonik’s core ERP to a wholly new architecture.

Not all SAP users are Goliaths like Dow and Evonik. Borchers, a paint additives company, has been a customer since 2008, shortly after Lanxess sold the business to OM Group. When OMG sold Borchers to investors in 2017, Borchers upgraded to an SAP product called Suite on Hana—essentially ECC software running on the same database as S/4Hana.

Borchers plans to fully upgrade to S/4 by 2022, says Jonathan Mortlock, the firm’s chief information officer. He wants to act before SAP terminates maintenance coverage for Suite on Hana, at which time he foresees a rush of upgrades by companies that are all competing for support from SAP.

And there are plenty of other ERP software options for small to midsize chemical companies. Datacom, a supplier of distribution and process management ERP software, is one example. It began serving the chemical industry with its Chempax software in 1981.

Sage Group, a UK-based supplier of ERP software, is another. The company’s software is often sold by firms that adapt its software for specific markets. Net at Work, for example, enhances Sage software with functionality geared to chemical companies in a product called Chem at Work.

MFG Chemical, a midsize specialty chemical company based in Dalton, Georgia, installed its first ERP system, Datacor’s Chempax, 9 years ago. “It basically houses all our supplier information,” says Andrew Hopkins, MFG’s quality assurance manager. Formulas and raw material lists and prices are stored and managed on the system, which accesses data from a network drive or central data server.

MFG also uses software called OESuite supplied by a company called Operational Sustainability. It coordinates information on changes to production procedures and functions independently from Chempax.

MFG is considering implementing a materials resource planning (MRP) module that already resides in its Chempax system, Hopkins says. While the company would likely benefit from MRP, which keeps track of orders and inventory, he says it would be a complex installation given the number of customers and products the company deals with.

Bettina Uhlich, chief information officer at Evonik Industries, says the firm will move to SAP’s latest ERP software, S/4Hana, by next year. – Credit: Evonik Industries

Reducing complexity remains a key target in business software development. Vestiges of monolithic ERP remain in place at most companies, as do vendor service agreements and a need for support in upgrading or adding to systems. Software developers aim to simplify upgrades by allowing businesses to configure IT in a distributed fashion that includes gateways to customers and suppliers.

As new software options emerge, users are expected to have more discretion in adding applications using low- or no-code techniques that have moved into IT architectures since they were introduced about 20 years ago.

No-code approaches are especially likely to surge in next-generation business computing. Software developers such as Itesign, a German start-up targeting a midyear product launch, envision a future in which IT departments equip corporate networks with menus of options from which users choose applications to add to their work processes, according to CEO Jan Philippe Wimmer.

Those IT departments of the future, Forrester’s Herbert notes, will be headed by business analysts as opposed to computer technicians. In fact, she envisions a complete dissolution of the core ERP system, a shift that will challenge IT departments to keep add-on applications from reverting to the kind of IT hodgepodge that led to monolithic ERP software in the first place.

But industry watchers agree that the ERP model born in the age of reengineering has already been obliterated. “It is no longer about systems solely within an enterprise,” Guay and colleagues write in Gartner’s recent report. ERP “has simply become a three-letter acronym for something that most people cannot describe other than to name a vendor or a list of modules. Whether or not we continue to use the acronym remains uncertain.”

Source: Rick Mullin


Epicor ERP is one of the few software that has already applied the low or no-code approach. Indeed, many Epicor users of Data V Tech in China and Vietnam, rarely have to face any of code-related hassles thanks to the experience of the consultants and the flexibility as well as customizability of the system per se. More importantly, Epicor has sucessfully built up reputation in the chemical industry in the world. For further information, please feel free to contact us. We will get back to you the soonest.

COVID-19 Pandemic as a Big Data Analytics Issue

Understanding the COVID-19 Pandemic as a Big Data Analytics Issue

Big data analytics techniques are well-suited for tracking and controlling the spread of COVID-19 around the world.

The rapid, global spread of COVID-19 has brought advanced big data analytics tools front and center, with entities from all sectors of the healthcare industry seeking to monitor and reduce the impact of this virus.

Researchers and developers are increasingly using artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing to track and contain coronavirus, as well as gain a more comprehensive understanding of the disease.

In the months since COVID-19 hit the US, researchers have been hard at work trying to uncover the nature of the virus – why it affects some more than others, what measures can help reduce the spread, and where the disease will likely go next.

At the core of these efforts is something with which the healthcare industry is very familiar: Data.

James Hendler, RPISource: Xtelligent Healthcare Media

“This is, in essence, a big data problem. We’re trying to track the spread of disease around the world,” James Hendler, the Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web, and Cognitive Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and director of the Rensselaer Institute for Data Exploration and Applications (IDEA), told HealthITAnalytics.

At RPI, researchers are using big data and analytics to better comprehend coronavirus from a number of different angles. The institute recently announced that it would offer government entities, research organizations, and industry access to innovative AI tools, as well as experts in data and public health to help combat COVID-19.

“We’re working with several organizations on modeling and dealing with the virus directly using a supercomputer, and we’ve been creating some websites where we track all the open data and documents we can find to help our researchers find what they’re looking for,” Hendler said.

“We also have some work we’ve been doing in understanding social media responses to the pandemic. One project, in particular, has focused on tracking data from Chinese social media as coronavirus spread there in mid-January, and then comparing it to American data.”

Between recognizing signs and symptoms, tracking the virus, and monitoring the availability of hospital resources, researchers are dealing with enormous amounts of information – too much for humans to comprehend and analyze on their own. It’s a situation that is seemingly tailor-made for advanced analytics technologies, Hendler noted.

“There are several big data components to this pandemic where artificial intelligence can play a big role,” he said.

“One component is biomedical research. A lot of work is going on to try to develop a vaccine to find out whether there is any current drugs work against COVID-19. All of those projects require molecular modeling, and many of them are using AI and machine learning to map things we know about the virus to things in pharmacological databases and genomic databases.”

Several big-name organizations have launched projects like these – Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud, and others have recently offered researchers free access to open datasets and analytics tools to help them develop COVID-19 solutions faster.

“AI can eliminate many false tracks and allow us to identify potential targets. So instead of trying 100 or 1000 different things, we can narrow it down to a much smaller size much faster. That’s going to accelerate the eventual finding of the vaccine,” Hendler said.

Researchers are also leveraging AI to evaluate the effects of COVID-19 interventions on individuals across the country, Hendler stated.

“A second component has to do with natural language processing and social media. What can we extract from social media that can help our scientists? What can we learn about how people are bearing the burdens and stresses of the pandemic?” he said.

“With SARS and other outbreaks, we never really had to figure out how different social distancing techniques are impacting the spread in different places. You can’t just compare numbers, because there are a lot of other factors to consider. AI is very good at that kind of multi-factor learning and a lot of people are trying to apply those techniques now.”

At UTHealth, a team developed an AI tool that showed the need for stricter, immediate interventions in the Greater Houston area. And at Stanford University, researchers have launched a data-driven model that predicts possible outcomes of various intervention strategies.

Using big data and analytics tools of their own, Hendler and his team is aiming to do something similar.

“We have a lot of time-series data from China, we have information about airline transportation, and we have population models for each country. Now we’re looking at doing this in our own region, and seeing if we can track and predict the spread based on the kind of social measures taken within different regions,” he said.

“We want to prototype that in our region and then scale it up to the US, and then eventually, the world.”

AI can also help organizations draw on research from the past, applying this knowledge to present and future situations.

“A third area where AI can make an impact is in mining scientific literature,” Hendler said.

“In past years, you had hundreds of grad students reading papers and trying to figure out what was going on. At many universities, there’s a lot of effort to say, ‘What can we learn from what’s already been published?’”

While AI and other analytics technologies appear to be the best possible tools for assessing and mitigating a global pandemic, researchers can’t always access what they need to build these models.

“The ideal data is hospital data that would tell us who is experiencing certain impacts from the virus,” Hendler said.

“For example, one project we’d love to do would be to correlate environmental or genomic factors to the people who are getting advanced respiratory problems, which is what’s killing most people with this disease. Is there a genetic component to that? Is it something where environmental factors are some kind of comorbidity? But can we get that kind of data because of HIPAA restrictions.”

Instead, research teams should focus on extracting insights from the information they do have available, Hendler said.

“Information about how people are moving, the effect of travel restrictions or stay at home orders, how many people have what – that’s data we can get. The more details we can get, the better, and a lot of that data are starting to be shared because you don’t have to say who the people are, just where the people are,” he said.

The unprecedented impact of coronavirus around the world has sparked the need for unprecedented partnerships, and these collaborations will contribute significantly to finding viable solutions.

“In healthcare, academia, and industry are mostly set up for people to stay in their own lanes. But people are rapidly beginning to realize that attacking this problem is going to require a collaborative effort,” Hendler concluded.

“To make any real progress in this situation, you need to bring together people who understand the computation and AI, people who understand the biological and biomedical implications, and people who understand population models. It’s a very interdisciplinary problem, and to make any headway, we need the data and we need the team.”

Source: Jessica Kent


With the assistance of ERP software, many manufacturers in Vietnam and China remain active during this pandemic without accelerating the spread of the pandemic. This solution has proved its high value during this crisis as it allows workers to work from home and connection as well as internal/external communication to continue seamlessly.

Data V Tech is proud to be one of the leading ERP vendors in the Asia Pacific. We have implemented Epicor ERP for many businesses in Asia Pacific. For direct consultation, please feel free to contact us.

Epicor ERP for cosmetics manufacturing in Dubai

Dubai-based cosmetics manufacturing firm enhances operations with Epicor ERP

Epicor Software Corporation has announced that Epoch Cosmetics and Toiletries has selected enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution, Epicor ERP, to improve manufacturing and warehousing operations and streamline information flow across the company.

                                        Amel Gardner, Epicor

Epicor partner, Cork Information Technology, will work with Epoch Cosmetics and Toiletries’ stakeholders to bring the full power of the Epicor platform to the company and its employees.

Dubai-based Epoch Cosmetics & Toiletries produces aerosols, deodorants, air fresheners and cosmetics for markets all around the world—including its native United Arab Emirates (UAE), the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, India, West Africa, Egypt, Oman, the UK, France, and the US.

The company supplies major brands—such as Elegant, Inspire, Pleasure, Hot & Cold, Mehas and The Scent—to distributors, and also offers contract manufacturing to other brands.

Having grown from a handful of employees to a monthly production capacity of more than two million products in just 10 years, Epoch Cosmetics & Toiletries realised they would need to replace their existing ERP solution to continue to expand and grow.

“As we grew, our legacy system was not catering to our needs, especially in manufacturing, warehousing and sales,” said Abbas Hamid, director at Epoch Cosmetics & Toiletries.

The company’s warehousing issues stemmed from a lack of real-time accuracy and visibility for on-hand stock levels from the front-end system. The necessity to implement manual workarounds was impacting productivity, and inaccuracies were affecting stock valuation.

In addition, stock retrieval was employee-driven, rather than system-driven, leading to further inaccuracies if goods were not correctly stored. Other complications existed based on the absence of a stock-taking module in the legacy ERP, requiring warehouse employees to perform an entirely manual reconciliation.

“In addition, the manufacturing module within the legacy system only captured the cost of materials, so labour costs and direct costs were never captured. These had to be generated through manual calculations and estimations, which affected our financials,” added Hamid.

Reporting was also cumbersome, with pending PO reports and shipment tracking requiring manual preparation, and the system offered no capability for real-time reporting.

Epoch Cosmetics & Toiletries decided it needed an ERP system that was tailored to their business operations, was easy to deploy and use, and would be flexible enough to allow the company to grow unimpeded. After considering four major ERP vendors, Hamid and his team selected Epicor ERP due to the manufacturing-centric focus and native functionality of the solution.

“While we obviously needed some level of customisation, we were very clear that we wanted to adapt to a system and be in line with best industry practices, rather than the other way around—where the system has to adapt to us,” added Hamid.

Epoch Cosmetics & Toiletries’ stakeholders were particularly drawn to the real-time reporting functionality of Epicor ERP, as well as its multi-region capabilities, so that future expansion plans would not be hampered and that consolidated reports could be easily compiled.

Implementation is expected to be completed by May 2020, and the company’s project team is currently working with regional Epicor partner, Cork Information Technology, to deploy the new solution to more than 40 users in the UAE. Supply chain, sales, CRM, manufacturing, finance and asset management will all be key areas of functionality that are expected to help enhance Epoch Cosmetics & Toiletries’ operations.

“All across the Middle East and North Africa region, manufacturing companies are trying to digitally transform, so that operations are optimised continually,” said Amel Gardner, regional director, Middle East, Africa and India (MEAI), Epicor. “Processes that are overly manual impede growth, so digitisation is the key to agility. Epoch Cosmetics & Toiletries realised its legacy architecture was holding back the fulfilment of its regional ambitions. When you have the vision to shake off the old and embrace the new, extraordinary things can happen. We are confident that with Epicor ERP in place, the company will march quickly towards a new horizon.”

Source: Tahawultech


Data V Tech is proud to be one of the leading ERP vendors in the Asia Pacific. We have implemented Epicor ERP for many manufacturing businesses in Vietnam and China. For further information, please feel free to contact us.

German machine tool industry returns

German machine tools to support industrial boom in Vietnam

The good news is Germany and German products enjoy an excellent reputation in Vietnam.

The VDW Symposium, which took place in Ho Chi Minh City on 14 May 2019, attracted some 100 high-calibre Vietnamese industry representatives. (Source: AHK Vietnam)

Confirming this at the recent VDW Symposium at Mekong Delta was Marko Walde, the executive director of the German-Vietnamese Chamber of Foreign Trade. The chamber is also a co-operation partner of the second VDW (German Machine Tool Builders’ Association) Symposium at Mekong Delta. The VDW Symposium, organized twice yearly since 2004, is to develop markets sustainably and repeat events regularly.

According to VDW, Vietnam’s economic development is continuing its upward trend and economic researchers are expecting the country’s GDP to have increased 7% in 2018. A further 6% growth has been predicted for 2019. New free trade agreements are opening up markets and attracting foreign investors to Vietnam. In 2018, the eight most important customer industries for machine tools invested 18% over the year before. Another 8% increase is expected this year and the growth is broad-based.

The aviation, medical technology, electrical/electronics, metal production, and processing industries and the mechanical engineering sector are investing disproportionately high amounts. “This is why now is the right time for the German machine tool industry to return to Vietnam to showcase its strengths,” said Klaus-Peter Kuhnmünch, organiser of the VDW Machine Tool Association’s foreign symposia.

Eleven manufacturers presented their manufacturing technology innovations in Ho Chi Minh City, namely Alzmetall, Chiron-Werke, Gleason Corporation, Grob-Werke, Heller, Index-Werke, Kapp Niles, Röders, Siemens, Trumpf and J.G. Weisser. “I was most impressed by the presentations and the selection of German companies,” said Nhat Pham, senior manager of Strategic Sourcing Marlow Vietnam, Company II-VI.

Potential for German machine tool manufacturers

Vietnam has established itself as an important link in international supply chains, meaning its manufacturers must be globally competitive, both qualitatively and price-wise. As such, the demand for sophisticated production technology is high. Machine tool consumption, an important indicator of the industry’s modernization efforts, is predicted to grow 8.2% this year, VDW says.

Mechanical engineering in Vietnam is not well developed. Local manufacturers only produce simple devices until now. Thus, progress to establish a modern, efficient industry is heavily dependent on machine tools imports.

Vietnam ranks 10th as importing nation

Internationally, Vietnam already ranks 10th as an importing nation, buying products up to a value worth €1 billion. Together with the U.S., Germany is one of the few Western suppliers selling machines to Vietnam, while South Korea, China, Japan, and Taiwan are dominant in this area. Since 2014, the German machine tool exports to Vietnam have risen by over 150%, recording a 215% increase alone in 2018. And, orders from Vietnam have more than tripled recently.

The German machine tool industry offers technologically sophisticated solutions that stand out from the mass-produced offerings of Asian competitors, Duong Tuan Ngoc, vice general director of Hong KY, Ho Chi Minh City noted. Duong: “We have already purchased machine tools from Switzerland this year. In the future, we will be taking a keen interest in high-precision milling machines from Germany.”

Kuhnmünch said: “In view of the Asian dominance and the great potential of the Vietnamese market, German manufacturers must take urgent action if they want to share in the Vietnamese boom.” And General Director of Trumpf Vietnam, Patrick Kemnitz, added: “Having a local presence is important for customer proximity. Service and after-sales are the core elements for ensuring further growth.”

Soltau-based Röders, which is already actively servicing the market, took part in the VDW symposium for the first time. The company has been operating a contract manufacturing plant in Vietnam since 2013.

The VDW Symposium was well attended, attracting some 100 participants. Interest levels were high and discussions were lively. Included too were 42 bilateral talks. Dirk Prust, chairman of Index-Werke noted: “The B2B meetings are a very useful addition to the presentations. The individual meetings provide a convenient opportunity to get into closer contact.” He added that one gets a lot about views, experiences, and abilities of potential customers here, which help in assessing needs and providing professional advice.

Source: Briggette Jaya


High-quality industrial tools separately, however, do not secure the productivity or the company’s position in international competition at the moment. They need to be ready to integrate into a system that reduces manual and tedious work while boost productivity to the level able to disrupt the market. In other words, it is optimal to install ERP-compatible machines.

Data V Tech is proud to be one of the leading ERP vendors in the Asia Pacific. We have implemented Epicor ERP for many enterprises and organizations in Vietnam and China. For direct consultation, please feel free to contact us.